andrew murray tagged posts

Free book Absolute Surrender by Andrew Murray

March – Free book Absolute Surrender Andrew Murray

Free book Absolute Surrender Andrew Murray

free book absolute surrender andrew murray

When you sign up to receive our newsletters (see sign-up form on the right), not only do you get an awesome free sign-up gift, but you’ll also receive an email each month with deals and a free Christian book of the month.  Our free book in March 2017 was “Absolute Surrender” by Andrew Murray.

Don’t miss out on any more free books – sign up today!

 

 


OTHER WORKS BY ANDREW MURRAY –

works of andrew murray  Andrew Murray free kindle book prayer  andrew murray free books pdf


 

Free Book Absolute Surrender Andrew Murray

 

Andrew Murray books online

Andrew Murray books online – Amazing deal!

Murray-Turkey-comparison

Now THIS is a deal that’s hard to beat!

50 Andrew Murray classics…for one amazing price!
Andrew Murray’s writings on prayer, humility, the Spirit of God, and the deeper Christian life have been a help and blessing to literally millions of Christians for over a century now.  With great Scriptural insight, deep truth and practical advice Murray’s writings are still as relevant today as when they were first written.

Now you can own and read all of his works for under $4.00!  That’s almost a-book-a-week for a year…for less than (an overpriced) cup of coffee!

Check it out on Amazon here.

andrew murray books online

TITLE: THE WORKS OF ANDREW MURRAY  (50-in-1)

AUTHOR: Andrew Murray
CATEGORY: CHRISTIAN LIVING, PRAYER, REVIVAL
Formats Available:

 Kindle eBook

 Kobo/Sony eBook

 

Unlike other collections, this includes the full text of 50 works of Andrew Murray. This is a very LARGE collection, carefully edited and put together and includes an active Table of Contents, as well as a Quick Table of Contents at the beginning for easy navigation.

NOTE: Below are all the works as they appear in this collection, in alphabetical order (with number of chapters in brackets). Since some works have been published with different titles, these have been included when known. A double-asterisk (**) denotes a rare or previously out-of-print work.
May you be blessed as you read the writings of this great man of God!

——————

BIOGRAPHY:
1. Official Biography of Andrew Murray [Illustrated] (23)
        [aka: The Life of Andrew Murray of South Africa]

BOOKS:
2. Abide in Christ (31)
3. Absolute Surrender (9)
4. Be Perfect (31)
5. Children for Christ, The (52)
6. Deeper Christian Life, The (8)
7. Divine Healing (32)
8. Fruit of the Vine (6)
9. Full Blessing of Pentecost, The (12)
        [aka: Experiencing the Holy Spirit; OR In Search of Spiritual Excellence]
10. Have Mercy Upon Me (31)
11. Holiest of All, The (130)
12. Holy in Christ (31)
13. Humility (12)
14. Inner Chamber and the Inner Life (36) **
15. Key to the Missionary Problem (10)
16. Let Us Draw Nigh (12)
17. Like Christ (32)
18. Lord’s Table: Right Observance of Lord’s Supper (24)
19. Masters Indwelling, The (13)
20. Ministry of Intercession, The (15)
21. New Life: Words for Young Disciples (52)
22. Out of His Fulness (15) **
23. Power of the Blood of Jesus, The (10)
24. Pray Without Ceasing (31)
25. Prayer Life, The (17)
26. School of Obedience (8)
27. Secret of the Cross (31)
28. Spirit of Christ (31)
29. Spiritual Life, The (16) **
30. State of the Church, The (20) **
31. Supreme Need, The (8) **
32. Thy Will Be Done (31)
33. True Vine, The (31)
34. Two Covenants, The (18)
35. Waiting on God! (31)
36. Why Do You Not Believe? (31)
37. With Christ in the School of Prayer (31)
38. Working for God! (31)

PAMPHLETS
39. Cross of Christ (5) **
40. Helps to Intercession (31)
41. In My Name (3) **
42. Jesus Himself (2)
43. Lord Teach Us To Pray (4)
44. Love Made Perfect (2) **
45. Money (4)
46. Power of Persevering Prayer (1)
47. Prophet Priest, The (4) **
48. Within, or the Kingdom of God is Within You (4)

EXTRACTS OF WILLIAM LAW – WITH NOTES BY ANDREW MURRAY
49. Dying to Self (31)
50. Power of the Spirit

 

Andrew Murray on Prayer and Revival

Andrew Murray on Prayer and Revival

 

A century ago Andrew Murray wrote a powerful little book called “The State of the Church” where he called believers back to a life of prayer and reliance on the Spirit.  In this portion (chapter 5 of “The State of the Church”) he points out the dire need in our churches for prayer and evangelism – a need that others such as D. L. Moody and F. B. Meyer also called for.  You can buy the full book here.

 


 

“THE disciples felt ashamed at their not being able to cast out the evil spirit. When Christ had sent them out to do the work, they had come back rejoicing that the evil spirits were subject to them. And here, in presence of the Pharisees, they had been brought to confusion by their impotence. They felt it deeply, and asked the Master to tell them what the cause of failure was. He answered with one word, Unbelief; they had not been living in communion with God and separation from the world; they had neglected prayer and fasting.

 

It is when the Church begins to feel the shame of the decline in membership as the loss of a power that she had in time past, and confesses that it is beyond her reach to find the cause and the cure, that she will learn to bow in penitent prayer for the Master to reveal to her the depth of the trouble, and the only way out of it.

 

In this chapter I want to call up three witnesses among the servants of Christ, to give evidence as to what they think of the state of affairs. Let the first be D. L. Moody. In the Christian of 24th December 1897, there appeared a letter to the New York Independent on the subject. He refers to a statement in a previous issue of that paper, “that there were over three thousand churches in the Congregational and Presbyterian bodies in the United States that did not report a single member added by profession of faith during the year.” Mr. Moody then adds, “Can this be true? The thought has taken such hold of me that I cannot get it out of my mind. It is enough almost to send a thrill of horror through the soul of every true Christian. Are we all going to sit still and let this thing continue? Shall we not lift up our voice like a trumpet about this matter? What must the Son of God think of such a result of our labour as this?”

 

In answer to Mr. Moody, the Independent explains that some allowance must be made for the new churches founded within the year, for small churches without a pastor, and for others that have failed to send up any report. The editor expresses his disagreement with what Mr. Moody had said in his letter about modern criticism and other causes of the evil. And then he proceeds: “But with all this true, Mr. Moody does well to be astonished and pained at the thousands of churches which reported not a single member added by profession of the faith last year. It is enough to send a thrill of pain through the soul of every true Christian.”

 

Let us pause ere we read on and say, What ought all this to mean to the Church?

 

Let Dr. Forsyth be the second witness. In his book, The Cruciality of the Cross, he writes thus: “It is reported from most quarters in England that there is a serious decline in Church membership. For this several explanations are given. But it is well to face the situation, and to avoid extenuation, and if we do we may discover that the real cause is the decay, not in religious interests or sympathies, but in personal religion of a positive and experienced kind, and often in the pulpit. Religious sympathies or energies are not Christian faith. We have become familiar with the statement that there is as good Christianity outside the Churches as in. This is not quite false, but it is much more false than true. It would be true enough if Christianity meant decent living, nice ways, precious kindness, business honour, ardent philanthropy and public righteousness. But all these fine and worthy things are quite compatible with the absence of personal communion with God, personal faith as Christ claims it; in the sense of personal experience of God in Jesus Christ, personal repentance, and personal peace in Christ as our eternal life. Yet that is God’s first charge on us, if Christianity be true. And it is this kind of Christianity which alone makes for a Church and its membership. Decay in membership of the Church is due to a decay of membership in Christ. Even among those who remain in active membership of our Churches, the type of religion has changed, the sense of sin can hardly be appealed to by preachers now, and to preach grace is in many (even orthodox quarters) regarded as theological obsession, and the wrong language for the hour, while justification by faith is practically obsolete.

 

“The grace of God cannot return to our preaching, or to our faith, till we recover from what has almost clean gone from our general, familiar, and current religion, what liberalism has quite lost I mean a due sense of the holiness of God. This holiness of God is the real foundation it is certainly the ruling interest of the Christian religion. Have our Churches lost that seal? Are we producing reform, social or theological, faster than we are producing faith? We are not seeking first the kingdom of God and His holiness, but only carrying on with very expensive and noisy machinery a kingdom-of-God’s industry. We are merely running the kingdom, and running it without the Cross. We have the old trade-mark, but what does that matter in a dry and thirsty land where no water is, if the artesian well on our premises is growing dry?”

 

Let us take to heart the lesson: It is the lack of positive personal religion, sometimes even in the pulpit, that explains the decline of membership.

 

Our third witness is the Rev. F. B. Meyer.  In an address on Acts 19 and the anointing power of the Holy Ghost, he says:

 

“There are four different planes of power the lowest is the physical, above that is the mental, above that is the moral, and above all is the spiritual. It is only when the man moves on the spiritual level that he has power with God, and has power over unclean spirits.

 

“It is because too many ministers and too many Christian workers to-day are content to live upon the intellectual level, or upon the moral plane, that their work is impotent to touch the mighty stronghold of Satan.

 

“The first question, therefore, to put to every Christian worker is: On what level are you working, on what level are you living? For if you are speaking on anything less than the Spirit level, know that your life will be largely a failure.”

 

He then tells the story of how the sons of Sceva had tried to cast out evil spirits in the name of Jesus whom Paul preached, of the answer that the evil spirit gave, “Jesus I know, and Paul I know, but who are ye?” and of the evil spirit leaping upon them, and mastering them so that they fled naked and wounded, and then proceeds: “Oh, where are we? We have been praying that God would send converts to the Churches, and stop this awful ebb; still the people are leaving our Churches, and the pews are empty. We have no additions, or few, to our Churches, and, pray as we may, we cannot avert it. Why? why? because the devil does not fear us. We have no power. The devil masters the Church and masters the world, and here are all we powerless, and he says, Jesus I know, and Paul I know; who are ye?

 

“You remember the words of our Lord: How can you enter into a strong man’s house until you have bound the strong man? We cannot spoil the house, because we have not bound the strong man. We have not bound the strong man in our own house. We do not know what it is to master the power of evil in our own hearts. How then can we rescue the men who are led captive at his will? It seems to me we have got to get back to prayer. O God, forgive us for our prayerlessness! God knows what a prayerless people we are. I do not wonder at things being as they are.”

 

Let us learn the lesson. The decline in membership is nothing but what may be most naturally expected where the work is not done in the power of the Spirit and in prayer. The spirit of darkness that rules in the world, and with its mighty attraction draws men from Christ and His Church, is too strong for us. Nothing and none can give the victory but the Spirit of God working in us. Would not one imagine that God’s servants would be delighted to think that they have such a Divine power working in them, and with their whole heart yield to its influence? Oh, let us turn to the Master to give us, into the very depth of our hearts, the answer to the question, Why could we not cast this evil spirit out? Because of your Unbelief. You did not believe in Me and in the power of My Spirit, and with prayer and fasting seek for it.

END OF CHAPTER 5 of “THE STATE OF THE CHURCH” by ANDREW MURRAY

 


 

Andrew Murray Books:

TITLE: THE WORKS OF ANDREW MURRAY  (50-in-1)

AUTHOR: Andrew Murray
CATEGORY: CHRISTIAN LIVING, PRAYER, REVIVAL
Formats Available:

 Kindle eBook

 Kobo/Sony eBook

 

Unlike other collections, this includes the full text of 50 works of Andrew Murray. This is a very LARGE collection, carefully edited and put together and includes an active Table of Contents, as well as a Quick Table of Contents at the beginning for easy navigation.

 


 

Andrew Murray’s classic “WITH CHRIST IN THE SCHOOL OF PRAYER” is included in:

TITLE: 7 CLASSICS ON PRAYER

AUTHOR: Bounds, Moody, Muller, Guyon, Goforth, Torrey, Murray
CATEGORY: PRAYER
Formats Available:

 Kindle eBook

 Kobo/Sony eBook

This fantastic compilation brings you 7 Christian classics on PRAYER. Ever struggled with how to pray, what to pray for, or just needed encouragement to keep praying? These powerful writings will stir your heart and strengthen your faith, helping you grow in communion with God.
These 7 have been chosen because they are practical, Biblical and have helped thousands throughout the centuries to grow in intimacy with God and in power in their prayer lives. Note: these aren’t just excerpts, these are the ENTIRE book of each classic.

SEVEN CLASSICS ON PRAYER:
• How To Pray – by R. A. Torrey [12 chapters]
• With Christ in the School of Prayer – by Andrew Murray [32 chapters]
• Prevailing Prayer – by D. L. Moody [11 chapters]
• How I Know God Answers Prayer – by Rosalind Goforth [10 chapters]
• Answers to Prayer – from George Muller’s Narratives [6 chapters]
• Power Through Prayer – by E. M. Bounds [20 chapters]
• A Short and Easy Method of Prayer – by Madame Jeanne Guyon [24 chapters]

 

 


Andrew Murray’s book “THE SPIRIT OF CHRIST” also included in:

TITLE: 5 GREAT CLASSICS ON THE HOLY SPIRIT  (5-in-1)

AUTHOR: Edwards, Murray, Torrey, Brengle, Bonar, Simpson
CATEGORY: HOLY SPIRIT
Formats Available:

 Kindle eBook

 Kobo/Sony eBook

This fantastic compilation brings you 5 of the greatest Christian classics on the Holy Spirit. Do you want to understand what the Scripture teaches about the Holy Spirit and get to know Him better in your own life? Are you interested in how the Holy Spirit has worked in revivals?
If so, then this collection is for you! Each book in this volume contains the full text of powerful and life-changing writings by men of God who saw the Holy Spirit work powerfully in their ministries. Their writings are practical, Biblical and have helped thousands throughout the centuries to know the Holy Spirit more.

5 GREAT CLASSICS ON THE HOLY SPIRIT contains:
• Distinguishing Marks of a Work of the Spirit of God – by Jonathan Edwards (1741).
• The Spirit of Christ – by Andrew Murray (1888) [31 chapters]
• Walking in the Spirit – by A. B. Simpson (1890′s) [14 chapters]
• When the Holy Ghost is Come – by Samuel Logan Brengle (1909) [23 chapters]
• The Person and Work of the Holy Spirit – by R. A. Torrey (1910) [22 chapters]

 


 

 

free-christian-ebooks-andrew-murray-christian-ebooks

William Law on Money, pt 2

A Serious Call to a Devout and Holy Life

William Law on Money – In his classic book “A Serious Call to a Devout and Holy Life” Law tackles the issue of faith and money head-on.  Does the Bible promote the Prosperity Gospel? Are we to seek more money and comfort for ourselves?  Get ready to be challenged as you read William Law’s writings…
Chapter 7
How the imprudent use of an estate corrupts all the tempers of the mind, and fills the heart with poor and ridiculous passions, through the whole course of life; represented in the character of Flavia.

IT HAS ALREADY been observed, that a prudent and religious care is to be used in the manner of spending our money or estate, because the manner of spending our estate makes so great a part of our common life, and is so much the business of every day, that according as we are wise, or imprudent, in this respect, the whole course of our lives will be rendered either very wise or very full of folly.
Persons that are well affected to religion, that receive instructions of piety with pleasure and satisfaction, often wonder how it comes to pass that they make no greater progress in that religion which they so much admire.
Now the reason of it is this: it is because religion lives only in their head, but something else has possession of their heart; and therefore they continue from year to year mere admirers and praisers of piety, without ever coming up to the reality and perfection of its precepts.
If it be asked why religion does not get possession of their hearts, the reason is this; it is not because they live in gross sins, or debaucheries, for their regard to religion preserves them from such disorders; but it is because their hearts are constantly employed, perverted, and kept in a wrong state by the indiscreet use of such things as are lawful to be used.
The use and enjoyment of their estate is lawful, and therefore it never comes into their heads to imagine any great danger from that quarter. They never reflect, that there is a vain and imprudent use of their estate, which, though it does not destroy like gross sins, yet so disorders the heart, and supports it in such sensuality and dulness, such pride and vanity, as makes it incapable of receiving the life and spirit of piety.

 



The above extract is from the beginning of chapter 7 of “A Serious Call to a Devout and Holy Life” by William Law.

You can find William Law’s book A SERIOUS CALL TO A DEVOUT AND HOLY LIFE in it’s entirety in the fantastic eBook collection: “The Complete Works of William Law”

TITLE: THE COMPLETE WORKS OF WILLIAM LAW  (17-in-1)

AUTHOR: William Law
CATEGORY: THEOLOGY, CHRISTIAN LIVING
Formats Available:

 Kindle eBook

 Kobo/Sony eBook

Wesley stated that his ‘Serious Account To A Devout And Holy Life’ was “a treatise which will hardly be excelled, if it be equalled, either for beauty of expression or for depth of thought.”
The famous devotional writer, Andrew Murray said, regarding Law’s Address To The Clergy, “I do not know where to find anywhere else the same clear and powerful statement of the truth which the Church needs at the present day.”

 


William Law’s work “A SERIOUS CALL TO A DEVOUT AND HOLY LIFE” also available in:

 

TITLE: THE HOLINESS COLLECTION  (7-in-1)

AUTHOR: various
CATEGORY: THEOLOGY, CHRISTIAN LIVING
Formats Available:

 Kindle eBook

 Kobo/Sony eBook

This fantastic compilation brings together some of the greatest classics on HOLINESS in Christian life and ministry. Learn the secret of walking in God’s presence and power from those whose writings have stirred and challenged countless Christians throughout history.

The Top 7 Classics on HOLINESS contains the full texts of:
• Purity of Heart – by William Booth (1902), 10 chapters.
• Heart Talks on Holiness – by Samuel Logan Brengle (1897), 27 chapters.
• Holiness: Its Nature, Hindrances, Difficulties, and Roots – by J. C. Ryle (1879), 21 chapters.
• God’s Way of Holiness – by Horatius Bonar (1864), 9 chapters.
• A Plain Account of Christian Perfection – by John Wesley (1777), entire book.
• A Serious Call to a Devout and Holy Life – by William Law (1729), 24 chapters.
• The Rules and Exercises of Holy Living – by Jeremy Taylor (1650), 27 sections.

 



free-christian-ebooks-william-law-christian-ebooks

William Law on the use of Money

William Law on the use of Money

william law on the use of money
A few hundred years ago William Law published his most famous work, “A Serious Call to a Devout and Holy Life.”  This book was to go on and have a profound effect on countless people and played an important role in the life and ministry of John Wesley.
     Law’s stated intent was (as is obvious from the title) to call people to a Christianity that went deeper than lip-service, towards a holy devotion that actually affected their entire lives.  More than a dry theological read, however, he creatively used stories of various people and the effect that devotion (or lack of it) made in their day-to-day lives.
One of the topics he touched on was the use of money and possessions – something still very relevant to our own day and age.  While written in 1728, perhaps we will have ears to hear the changes we need to make in our own lives today?  He brings classic arguments in regards to the Prosperity Gospel teaching of today.
Below is chapter 6 of William Law’s book that touches on this important topic:
* Note, emphasis (bold/italic) is mine.

 



A SERIOUS CALL TO A DEVOUT AND HOLY LIFE,   CHAPTER 6:   

Containing the great obligations, and the great advantages of making a wise and religious use of our estates and fortunes.

AS THE HOLINESS of Christianity consecrates all states and employments of life unto God, as it requires us to aspire after an universal obedience, doing and using everything as the servants of God, so are we more specially obliged to observe this religious exactness in the use of our estates and fortunes.
The reason of this would appear very plain, if we were only to consider, that our estate is as much the gift of God, as our eyes or our hands, and is no more to be buried or thrown away at pleasure, than we are to put out our eyes, or throw away our limbs as we please.
But, besides this consideration, there are several other great and important reasons why we should be religiously exact in the use of our estates.

First, Because the manner of using our money or spending our estate enters so far into the business of every day, and makes so great a part of our common life, that our common life must be much of the same nature as our common way of spending our estate. If reason and religion govern us in this, then reason and religion have got great hold of us; but if humour, pride, and fancy, are the measures of our spending our estate, then humour, pride, and fancy, will have the direction of the greatest part of our life.
Secondly, Another great reason for devoting all our estate to right uses, is this: because it is capable of being used to the most excellent purposes, and is so great a means of doing good. If we waste it we do not waste a trifle, that signifies little, but we waste that which might be made as eyes to the blind, as a husband to the widow, as a father to the orphan; we waste that which not only enables us to minister worldly comforts to those that are in distress, but that which might purchase for ourselves everlasting treasures in Heaven. So that if we part with our money in foolish ways, we part with a great power of comforting our fellow-creatures, and of making ourselves forever blessed.
If there be nothing so glorious as doing good, if there is nothing that makes us so like to God, then nothing can be so glorious in the use of our money, as to use it all in works of love and goodness, making ourselves friends, and fathers, and benefactors, to all our fellow-creatures, imitating the Divine love, and turning all our power into acts of generosity, care, and kindness to such as are in need of it.
     If a man had eyes, and hands, and feet, that he could give to those that wanted them; if he should either lock them up in a chest, or please himself with some needless or ridiculous use of them, instead of giving them to his brethren that were blind and lame, should we not justly reckon him an inhuman wretch? If he should rather choose to amuse himself with furnishing his house with those things, than to entitle himself to an eternal reward, by giving them to those that wanted eyes and hands, might we not justly reckon him mad?
Now money has very much the nature of eyes and feet; if we either lock it up in chests, or waste it in needless and ridiculous expenses upon ourselves, whilst the poor and the distressed want it for their necessary uses; if we consume it in the ridiculous ornaments of apparel, whilst others are starving in nakedness; we are not far from the cruelty of him, that chooses rather to adorn his house with the hands and eyes than to give them to those that want them. If we choose to indulge ourselves in such expensive enjoyments as have no real use in them, such as satisfy no real want, rather than to entitle ourselves to an eternal reward, by disposing of our money well, we are guilty of his madness, that rather chooses to lock up eyes and hands, than to make himself forever blessed, by giving them to those that want them. For after we have satisfied our own sober and reasonable wants, all the rest of our money is but like spare eyes or hands; it is something that we cannot keep to ourselves without being foolish in the use of it, something that can only be used well, by giving it to those that want it.
     Thirdly, If we waste our money, we are not only guilty of wasting a talent which God has given us, we are not only guilty of making that useless, which is so powerful a means of doing good, but we do ourselves this further harm, that we turn this useful talent into a powerful means of corrupting ourselves; because so far as it is spent wrong, so far it is spent in support of some wrong temper, in gratifying some vain and unreasonable desires, in conforming to those fashions, and pride of the world, which, as Christians and reasonable men, we are obliged to renounce.
As wit and fine parts cannot be trifled away, and only lost, but will expose those that have them into greater follies, if they are not strictly devoted to piety; so money, if it is not used strictly according to reason and religion, can not only be trifled away, but it will betray people into greater follies, and make them live a more silly and extravagant life, than they could have done without it. If, therefore, you do not spend your money in doing good to others, you must spend it to the hurt of yourself. You will act like a man, that should refuse to give that as a cordial to a sick friend, though he could not drink it himself without inflaming his blood. For this is the case of superfluous money; if you give it to those that want it, it is a cordial; if you spend it upon yourself in something that you do not want, it only inflames and disorders your mind, and makes you worse than you would be without it.
Consider again the forementioned comparison; if the man that would not make a right use of spare eyes and hands, should, by continually trying to use them himself, spoil his own eyes and hands, we might justly accuse him of still greater madness.
Now this is truly the case of riches spent upon ourselves in vain and needless expenses; in trying to use them where they have no real use, nor we any real want, we only use them to our great hurt, in creating unreasonable desires, in nourishing ill tempers, in indulging our passions, and supporting a worldly, vain turn of mind. For high eating and drinking, fine clothes, and fine houses, state and equipage, carefree pleasures, and diversions, do all of them naturally hurt and disorder our hearts; they are the food and nourishment of all the folly and weakness of our nature, and are certain means to make us vain and worldly in our tempers. They are all of them the support of something, that ought not to be supported; they are contrary to that sobriety and piety of heart which relishes Divine things; they are like so many weights upon our minds, that make us less able, and less inclined, to raise up our thoughts and affections to the things that are above.
  So that money thus spent is not merely wasted or lost, but it is spent to bad purposes, and miserable effects, to the corruption and disorder of our hearts, and to the making us less able to live up to the sublime doctrines of the Gospel. It is but like keeping money from the poor, to buy poison for ourselves.
For so much as is spent in the vanity of dress, may be reckoned so much laid out to fix vanity in our minds. So much as is laid out for idleness and indulgence, may be reckoned so much given to render our hearts dull and sensual. So much as is spent in state and equipage, may be reckoned so much spent to dazzle your own eyes, and render you the idol of your own imagination. And so in everything, when you go from reasonable wants, you only support some unreasonable temper, some turn of mind, which every good Christian is called upon to renounce.
So that on all accounts, whether we consider our fortune as a talent, and trust from God, or the great good that it enables us to do, or the great harm that it does to ourselves, if idly spent; on all these great accounts it appears, that it is absolutely necessary to make reason and religion the strict rule of using all our fortune.
Every exhortation in Scripture to be wise and reasonable, satisfying only such wants as God would have satisfied; every exhortation to be spiritual and heavenly, pressing after a glorious change of our nature; every exhortation to love our neighbour as ourselves, to love all mankind as God has loved them, is a command to be strictly religious in the use of our money. For none of these tempers can be complied with, unless we be wise and reasonable, spiritual and heavenly, exercising a brotherly love, a godlike charity, in the use of all our fortune. These tempers, and this use of our worldly goods, is so much the doctrine of all the New Testament, that you cannot read a chapter without being taught something of it. I shall only produce one remarkable passage of Scripture, which is sufficient to justify all that I have said concerning this religious use of all our fortune.

“When the Son of man shall come in his glory, and all the holy angels with him, then shall he sit upon the throne of his glory: and before him shall be gathered all nations: and he shall separate them one from another, as a shepherd divideth his sheep from the goats: and he shall set the sheep on his right hand, but the goats on the left. Then shall the King say unto them on his right hand, Come, ye blessed of my Father, inherit the kingdom prepared for you from the foundation of the world: for I was an hungered, and ye gave me meat: I was thirsty, and ye gave me drink: I was a stranger, and ye took me in: naked, and ye clothed me: I was sick, and ye visited me: I was in prison, and ye came unto me . . . Then shall he say unto them on the left hand, Depart from me, ye cursed, into everlasting fire, prepared for the devil and his angels: for I was an hungered, and ye gave me no meat: I was thirsty, and ye gave me no drink: I was a stranger, and ye took me not in: naked, and ye clothed me not: sick, and in prison, and ye visited me not. These shall go away into everlasting punishment: but the righteous into life eternal.” [Matt. xxv. 31-64]

     I have quoted this passage at length, because if one looks at the way of the world, one would hardly think that Christians had ever read this part of Scripture. For what is there in the lives of Christians, that looks as if their salvation depended upon these good works? And yet the necessity of them is here asserted in the highest manner, and pressed upon us by a lively description of the glory and terrors of the day of judgment.
Some people, even of those who may be reckoned virtuous Christians, look upon this text only as a general recommendation of occasional works of charity; whereas it shows the necessity not only of occasional charities now and then, but the necessity of such an entire charitable life, as is a continual exercise of all such works of charity, as we are able to perform…
There is no middle way to be taken, any more than there is a middle way betwixt pride and humility, or temperance and intemperance. If you do not strive to fulfil all charitable works, if you neglect any of them that are in your power, and deny assistance to those that want what you can give, let it be when it will, or where it will, you number yourself amongst those that want Christian charity. Because it is as much your duty to do good with all that you have, and to live in the continual exercise of good works, as it is your duty to be temperate in all that you eat and drink.
Hence also appears the necessity of renouncing all those foolish and unreasonable expenses, which the pride and folly of mankind have made so common and fashionable in the world. For if it is necessary to do good works, as far as you are able, it must be as necessary to renounce those needless ways of spending money which render you unable to do works of charity.
You must therefore no more conform to these ways of the world than you must conform to the vices of the world; you must no more spend with those that idly waste their money as their own humour leads them, than you must drink with the drunken, or indulge yourself with the epicure: because a course of such expenses is no more consistent with a life of charity than excess in drinking is consistent with a life of sobriety. When, therefore, any one tells you of the lawfulness of expensive apparel, or the innocence of pleasing yourself with costly satisfactions, only imagine that the same person was to tell you, that you need not do works of charity; that Christ does not require you to do good unto your poor brethren, as unto Him; and then you will see the wickedness of such advice. For to tell you that you may live in such expenses, as make it impossible for you to live in the exercise of good works, is the same thing as telling you that you need not have any care about such good works themselves.

 



You can find William Law’s book A SERIOUS CALL TO A DEVOUT AND HOLY LIFE in it’s entirety in the fantastic eBook collection: “The Complete Works of William Law”

TITLE: THE COMPLETE WORKS OF WILLIAM LAW  (17-in-1)

AUTHOR: William Law
CATEGORY: THEOLOGY, CHRISTIAN LIVING
Formats Available:

 Kindle eBook

 Kobo/Sony eBook

Wesley stated that his ‘Serious Account To A Devout And Holy Life’ was “a treatise which will hardly be excelled, if it be equalled, either for beauty of expression or for depth of thought.”
The famous devotional writer, Andrew Murray said, regarding Law’s Address To The Clergy, “I do not know where to find anywhere else the same clear and powerful statement of the truth which the Church needs at the present day.”

 


William Law’s work “A SERIOUS CALL TO A DEVOUT AND HOLY LIFE” also available in:

 

TITLE: THE HOLINESS COLLECTION  (7-in-1)

AUTHOR: various
CATEGORY: THEOLOGY, CHRISTIAN LIVING
Formats Available:

 Kindle eBook

 Kobo/Sony eBook

This fantastic compilation brings together some of the greatest classics on HOLINESS in Christian life and ministry. Learn the secret of walking in God’s presence and power from those whose writings have stirred and challenged countless Christians throughout history.

The Top 7 Classics on HOLINESS contains the full texts of:
• Purity of Heart – by William Booth (1902), 10 chapters.
• Heart Talks on Holiness – by Samuel Logan Brengle (1897), 27 chapters.
• Holiness: Its Nature, Hindrances, Difficulties, and Roots – by J. C. Ryle (1879), 21 chapters.
• God’s Way of Holiness – by Horatius Bonar (1864), 9 chapters.
• A Plain Account of Christian Perfection – by John Wesley (1777), entire book.
• A Serious Call to a Devout and Holy Life – by William Law (1729), 24 chapters.
• The Rules and Exercises of Holy Living – by Jeremy Taylor (1650), 27 sections.

 



free-christian-ebooks-william-law-serious-call